Americans Waste Record-Setting 658 Million Vacation Days

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  • June 16, 2016
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American workers took slightly more vacation in 2015, up to 16.2 days from 16.0 days the year before, according to new research from Project: Time Off. But the meager increase comes as workers received an additional day (21.9 days on average), but used a lower share of vacation time than in 2014.

It is commonly assumed that economic trends are driving the decline, but the State of American Vacation found no correlation to unemployment rates or consumer confidence. Rather, America’s time off habits closely track technology innovation and adoption trends, suggesting that connectivity has intensified Americans’ attachment to work and reduced their ability to break free of the office.

“Technological advancements have irreversibly changed the way we work—in many ways for the better—but the omnipresent office requires being intentional about our time,” said Project: Time Off Senior Director and report author Katie Denis. “Americans need to decide whether vacation will become a casualty of the new working world or if we will change to win back America’s Lost Week.”

More than half of American workers (55%) left vacation time unused in 2015. This adds up to 658 million unused vacation days. It is the highest number Project: Time Off has ever reported, far exceeding the previous 429 million count. The increase highlights the difference between American workers’ intent and action. Previous Project: Time Off surveys, conducted mid-year, asked about anticipated vacation usage. The latest survey, conducted in January 2016, asked respondents about their actual usage for 2015, providing a more accurate picture of America’s vacation habits.

What’s Stopping Them?

The reasons behind work martyrdom have lessened, even if only slightly, since 2014. Workers cite returning to a mountain of work (37% in 2016 vs. 40% in 2014) as the greatest challenge, followed by no one else can do the job (35% vs. 30%) and cannot afford a vacation (33% vs. 30%).

Beyond the pressures workers place on themselves, managers play a key role in vacation habits as employees ranked their boss the most powerful influencer when it comes to taking time off. Further, 80 percent of employees said they would be likely to take more time off if they felt fully supported and encouraged by their boss.

Unfortunately, nearly six in ten (58%) employees report a lack of support from their boss and more than half (53%) report the same from their colleagues. Analysis found a positive correlation between employees who feel strong support from their bosses and colleagues and employee engagement. The more support an employee feels, the more likely they are to report higher levels of happiness with their company and job.

Power of Planning
The single-most important step workers can take is to plan their time off in advance, as more than half (51%) of planners used all their earned vacation time compared to 39% of non-planners. Yet less than half (49%) of households set aside time to plan their vacation time each year. Further, planners reported greater happiness in every category measured, especially relationships with partners and children.

“This is truly a crossroads for America. Are we living through the end of our vacation traditions?” said Project: Time Off Managing Director Gary Oster. “There are glimmers of hope, but to make real progress, we need to make the conscious choice that time off is as important as time on.”

A well-managed travel club can help employers manage vacations so that employees remain healthier. Custom Travel Clubs provides a well-designed travel club platform with a host of travel benefits which makes it very easy for members to book and plan their travel.

For more info, contact:

Mike Putman
mike@customtravelclubs.com
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